• Press

What Advertisers Want: How Audience Measurement is Changing

October 25, 2018


A capacity crowd at the latest RTS early evening event heard how the television industry is trying to keep advertisers happy – and out of the clutches of its online competitors.

With the rapid increase in video-on-demand (VoD) viewing, over-the-top services such as Netflix and mobile TV, working out who watches TV – and when and where – has become a complicated business.

This is the data that advertisers want – and which ratings body Barb is doing its utmost to provide, according to chief executive Justin Sampson.

He used recent BBC thriller Killing Eve – the entire series of which was made available to viewers on iPlayer, following the transmission of episode one – to illustrate the diversity of modern viewing habits.

Sampson revealed that 3.87 million people watched episode 4 before it was broadcast, 2.26 million saw it live and 2.48 million watched it during the following week. The total audience was 8.6 million, of which 90% was watched on TV sets, the remainder on other devices.

In September, Barb launched multiple-screen programme ratings, which measure audiences on TV sets, tablets, PCs and smartphones. This new measurement is a key part of Barb’s Project Dovetail, whose objective is to provide the total reach of programme and commercial audiences across multiple screens.

Nevertheless, gaps in the measurement of TV viewing remain. “The rise of unidentified viewing is a big challenge for Barb,” said Sampson, who revealed that this year, on average, viewers have spent an average 47 minutes a day watching content on services that Barb is currently unable to measure such as Netflix, Amazon and YouTube.

For young adults, who are less wedded to traditional telly than older viewers, the figure rises to 69 minutes a day.

Sampson issued an invitation at the RTS event: “Anybody who wans to meet and work with Barb –we’re happy to talk to them.”

 

 

Read the full article on the Royal Television Society website.